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Archive for the ‘iPhone’ Category

See Breeze – Augmented Reality Wind Visualizer for iPhone and iPad

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Ajnaware’s latest app “See Breeze” has just been approved by Apple, and is now available from the app store. This app has a universal binary – so can be installed onto either iPhone 3GS or onto iPad from the same purchase.

Like Sun Seeker, this app pushes the boundaries of what augmented reality on mobile devices can be used for. The app description is as follows.

Provides both a FLAT VIEW COMPASS and an AUGMENTED REALITY 3-D VIEW showing the local wind and weather conditions with animated wind vectors.

Ideal For:
– Aviators, Sailors, Surfers, Windsurfers, Kite Flyers, Cyclists, Fire Fighters, Weather Hobbyists and any other outdoor enthusiasts

Main Features:
– Compass view showing animated wind vectors for nearest weather stations with wind, temperature and humidity readings
– 3-D augmented reality view with animated wind vectors
– List of local observation stations (up to 10 nearest), from which any may be selected for individual wind viewing
– Map view of all local stations with weather arrows showing direction, speed and temperature
– Uses official Bureau of Meteorology data within Australia, and NOAA metar data (from airports) for rest of world

Feature Device Dependencies:
– iPhone – interface runs only in portrait mode, 3-D View is shown as an overlay on the camera view
– iPad – interface runs in any device orientation, 3-D View is displayed with an opaque background (due to absence of camera)

I had the idea for this app about the same time as I had the idea for Sun Seeker, but I had to choose just one to do first, and even when I did start it, I found that it took a lot longer than expected due to the various technical challenges involved. The first major challenge was learning some OpenGL ES, and the second one was figuring out how to get OpenGL ES to respond correctly to device orientation and heading changes. Many thanks to Jeff LaMarche for some great blog articles on the former, and as for the latter, I pretty much had to figure it out for myself. I did post on Stack Overflow, but ended up answering my own question.

Adapting the app to iPad was also an interesting issue to deal with. I ended up with quite a few conditional branches in the code to deal with cosmetic differences. But the end result more than justified the extra effort. It looks superb on the iPad. Credit for the excellent app artwork goes to Peter Fellows once again, whose work on the Oz Weather program was brilliant. Here are a few screenshots from the iPhone app.

and one from the iPad app, which of course has much nicer mapping ability…

Written by ajnaware

Sunday, 11 April 2010 at 10:42 am

Plotting a Cold Change

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Saturday 23rd January 2010 saw a classic heatwave/cold front event occurring up the eastern coast of New South Wales Australia, and I observed from Sydney, watching things progress during the day via the internet, as well as from my own home, where I have a view across parts of Sydney.

Oz Weather v2.1 introduced graphing of weather history as a new feature, and the graphs from that day show the change very clearly indeed. The following graph is a composite of the different ones available in Oz Weather, although I have overlaid a transparent bar indicating the time when the main changed occurred.

A summary of the changes:

  • Temperature dropped from about 41°C to 22°C.
  • Humidity jumped from 10% to 85%
  • Wind jumped from 30km/h to 65km/h with gusts to over 95km/h just as the change came through, and the direction shifted from NW to S.
  • Interestingly, the pressure started to rise an hour or so before the main change, and there was a little rain from some thunder cells that developed following the change.

The Doppler (wind) radar also showed the approach of the wind change very clearly. Unfortunately I didn’t save a graphic from when the change was passing right through Sydney, but an earlier shot shows the change passing through Stanwell Park, to the south of Sydney.

The key point here is to note that blue indicates wind towards the radar location (centre of crosshairs) and yellow indicates wind away from the radar location. So this is showing strong NorthWest winds (blowing offshore) over the Sydney region, but from the South at Stanwell Park and below. This picture was a lot more striking as the change passed through Sydney itself, but I’ll have to wait for another event to show that off better!

Written by ajnaware

Sunday, 24 January 2010 at 8:53 am

Posted in iPhone, Weather

Tagged with ,

Sun Seeker Lite

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I’m pleased to announce the arrival of Sun Seeker Lite – a free version of Sun Seeker (finalist in the 2009 Best App Ever awards), albeit without the augmented reality view!

After my recent experiments and experiences with in-app purchase, I’m now putting more effort into the Lite version concept. Although it requires creating a whole new app, in practice it is simpler and safer than the in-app purchase method, for a range of reasons. In fact I have already added an Oz Weather Lite version of the full Oz Weather app, and Sun Seeker Lite is my second Lite app.

That is not to say that the decision of exactly what features to put into a Lite version is an easy one. In this case I removed all augmented reality features, which is of course the big selling point of the full app, but on the other hand I’m pleased enough with the look and feel of the main screen’s flat compass view, that I think it will create the right impression for users, and persuade them that the quality is good enough to warrant purchasing the full app.

Despite the fact that it does omit the augmented reality view, the flat compass view in the Lite app can still be very useful in many situations. Please give it a go, and pass on the word to others if you like it, or perhaps even (gasp!) leave a positive review. ;-)

Written by ajnaware

Saturday, 23 January 2010 at 5:26 pm

Sun Seeker is Finalist in 2009 Best AR App Award

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I have a vague memory of Sun Seeker having been nominated for something at some point… but then obviously forgot all about it. But today I received an email telling me it is a finalist in the “2009 Best App Ever Awards” in the category of Best Augmented Reality App.

I’m guessing that it wouldn’t have reached this stage without some people having decided that it was a worthy app, so this much is gratifying in itself. But if you have any inkling at all to offer some support for the public vote, please feel free to use the following link to place a vote, and augment the app’s chances against some of the other very high profile contenders. :-)

Vote for
Sun Seeker: 3D Augmented Reality Vi…
in
Best Augmented Reality App

This is especially pleasing to me because I have found that most people (at least initially) don’t seem to understand what the app is useful for. But when they do finally get it, the response is of course much more enthusiastic.

BTW – I’m still intending to do much more with AR, and hope to be able to report on my progress later.

Written by ajnaware

Sunday, 3 January 2010 at 6:26 pm

Oz Weather Apponomics – Birthday Edition

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This is the latest installment tracking the progress of the Oz Weather iPhone app in the iTunes app store. (Part 7 installment here.)

Oz Weather v1.0 arrived in the app store on 1st November 2008 (now at v1.7.1), so I now have a full years of stats to share with you.

  • Total paid app downloads: 64,500 (176 per day on average)
  • Net app revenue: AUD$99,600 (US$89,700) – net of 30% Apple share and 10% Australian GST
  • Average User Rating: 4 stars – from 1187 ratings of all versions
  • Average ranking: 17.5 – in Australian app store

[Stop Press - AUD$100k sales were reached on 3rd Nov 2009]

The following graph shows a complete history of one year’s worth of daily sales records.

SalesGraph_2009_10

The associated Australian overall paid apps ranking is as follows:

RankGraphAus_2009_10

So there have been a number of peaks and troughs. The single biggest factor causing those peaks and troughs appears to have been Apple promotions in the Hot / New / Staff Pick lists. But this has worked both ways – the biggest troughs have occurred when Apple has promoted competing apps.

The second biggest factor has been the weather itself. In Australia it seems that people are more interested in summer weather than they are in winter weather, hence causing an underlying annual cycle which peaks in summer (Dec/Jan/Feb) and troughs in winter (Jun/Jul/Aug).

Some individual weather events (eg. extreme heat waves, major rainfall events) seem to account for much shorter term peaks – especially noticeable around Feb 2009 when a major app update was also released.

Its also worth noting that during the course of the year the number of competitors has grown substantially. No doubt other developers have noticed how well weather apps seem to do in the app store ecosystem, and I would guess that my blogging about such attractive sales figures has probably encouraged some of the new ones into the game too. ;-)  However, most of the newer competitors have failed to get any significant visibility, at least so far, and overall I don’t regret my decision to be transparent and open with my sales figures. I am always delighted to read about the inside stories of other app developers’ successes and failures, and hope that my own story has been interesting and useful to others too.

Written by ajnaware

Sunday, 8 November 2009 at 5:54 pm

Sun Seeker – What is it Good For?

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There have been quite a few news and blog mentions of Sun Seeker since it’s release (described in this previous post), which has created some good interest in it, and yes, some good app sales too. But a common reaction of press reviewers seems to be to question what you would use it for. I have to say, frankly, that I am a little surprised. How could you not immediately understand how useful this app really is?!

SunSeeker for Real Estate

But then it dawned on me (whoops, no pun intended!). We are not all born the same. Some of us do seem to have that extra geek gene, which means that some things which seem really obvious to us are pretty much obscure to others. And vice-versa of course, as I know all too well, often to my own detriment. ;-)

Thankfully, however, some of those who bought the app do already “get it”, and a few kind souls have left some great comments explaining exactly how they find it useful – and some of these are in ways that I had not even imagined myself. As these comments are spread around different countries’ app stores, I thought it might help to list a few of them here. I have added highlighting to various words and phrases to emphasize the types of usage people are using it for.

I bought this app to track the suns position on the cockpit window during my trips as an airline pilot, this app works better than I had hoped. I now use this app as a situational awareness tool, keeping track of possible solar glare on final approaches to particular runways. It works awsome in the virtual 3d view because of the slaved compass I can find the suns relative position with reference to any runway. This is really a great app. (Lwm5 – USA)

Fantastic – shows the true utility of augmented reality apps. As an architect I have been doing solar analysis of sites by printing solar charts, taking pictures and noting bearings & altitue of horizon (trees mnts structures etc) – then combining info in Photoshop. With this app it’s as easy as pointing the camera to get a sense of the solar access of a site at different times of day / year. (smh_iTunes – USA)

I work in the Solar industry and this works exceptionally well for aligning solar arrays and showing customers the path of the sun. GREAT app :-) (Clear James – Australia)

The perfect app for DOP’s Gaffers and anyone that needs to know where the sun path will be and where you will lose the sun behind a building etc. The augmented reality is flawless and helps anyone plan out a photo/film shoot to the hour. A steal at this price. (Metromadman – Australia)

It might also be worth noting that, currently, the best sales of this app are being made in… Japan. How fitting, given that it is sometimes know as the land of the rising sun!

Currently Sun Seeker is #6 in paid apps in the Navigation category, there. I’m guessing that this might have something to do with the fact that Japanese are known for being early and enthusiastic adopters of new technology. This helps in two ways – firstly because there might be a strong uptake of the latest 3GS iPhone model (required for this app), and secondly because the area of augmented reality is so new to the consumer space, and offers exciting new ways of using the technology, which may not be immediately obvious to those more reluctant to embrace unfamiliar technology.

Now why can’t Westerners be more like the Japanese?

So until next time – Konichiwa! :-)

Written by ajnaware

Saturday, 24 October 2009 at 12:04 pm

Sun Seeker – Seeing the Light with Augmented Reality

with 100 comments

I am pleased to announce that my new app “Sun Seeker” was approved by Apple on the second attempt, 31 days after the initial submission, and is now available in the iTunes appstore. Note – As it requires use of a compass, it will only work with the iPhone 3GS devices.

Sun Seeker in App Store

I have recorded a brief video demo showing how it works.

This app shows you where the sun is now, and what path it takes through the sky, either for today or for any day of the year, for your current location.

It has two main views.

  • A flat compass view
  • An augmented reality camera overlay view

It is valuable for real estate buyers (to find the sun and light exposure of any room throughout the course of the year), for gardeners and landscapers (to find hours of sun exposure for any location in the garden), for photographers (to find when the sun will be shining at the right angle), and for anyone interested in daily variations of rise and set times of the sun.

Sun SeekerThe above shot shows the opening view – which displays the sun’s day/night path segments using the flat compass. Typically you would hold the iPhone horizontally in your hand, and then you can easily see the directions of the rise point, set point, and which direction the sun is in right now – the yellow triangle. The other information displayed here is:

  • Current latitude and longitude (from built-in GPS)
  • How long since the sun rose, and until it sets; or if at night, how long since it set and how long until it rises
  • The sun’s heading (azimuth) angle and elevation. If you watch these you will see them ticking over as the sun moves.
  • Shadow ratio (length of shadow in comparison with the vertical height of a an object) and path length (the multiple of atmospheric thicknesses through which the sunlight has traveled).

Tapping the camera icon changes the app into its augmented reality overlay view.

Sun Seeker AR View

The types of information you see here are:

  • If the sun is not already in view, then a pointer showing which direction to turn towards to find the sun
  • The current heading (azimuth) and elevation of the centre of your camera view
  • The sun’s current position and its opposite shadow point
  • The sun’s path throughout today with hour positions marked – including the nighttime segment below the horizon
  • Optionally also in blue the sun’s path on the shortest day of the year, and in red for the longest day of the year
  • Grid lines of equal heading (purple for cardinal compass directions E/S/W/N and red for others) and elevation (blue)
  • The horizon line (green)

You may find this especially valuable if you look towards the rise and set points near a room’s window or on a balcony. You can then see the range of directions through which the sun rises (or sets), and therefore when it will shine through that window or onto that balcony, and for roughly how many hours at different times of the year.

Further details you can obtain are shown in the following view.

Further Details

So you can see that this app uses augmented reality a little differently from most other newly released apps, and it can provide genuinely valuable information that is not easily available by any other means. It effectively turns your iPhone into an advanced sun tracking device.

I created this app because I was myself in the process of buying property, and it was just what I needed myself.  I hope that some of you might also find it useful, as well as fun to use and to show off your iPhone!

* * *

More recent news and discussion about Sun Seeker on Facebook:

More recent blog entries on Sun Seeker:

Note – Sun Seeker is now available for Android! (March 2012)

https://market.android.com/details?id=com.ajnaware.sunseeker

Written by ajnaware

Tuesday, 6 October 2009 at 8:56 pm

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